Blog Archives

Pet allergies are big business

By Darcy Reynolds, http://www.columbusceo.com/

allergydogIt’s that dreaded season. Allergens are bountiful and wreaking havoc on our eyes, noses and throats. But the allergy suffering isn’t exclusive to humans. The misery many of us have to deal with can extend to our very best friends; our beloved household pets.

Allergic symptoms in dogs and cats can translate into frustration, misery and big business. If you have spent time in the company of a favorite canine and witnessed persistent licking and paw chewing along with incessant scratching, red skin and “hot spots” plus itchy ears and runny eyes, you are likely watching the effect of allergies in action. Cats, too, present allergies in a similar manner along signs such as hair loss, scabs or open sores, excessive scratching and discharge in the ears.

In both people and pets, an allergy is a state of hypersensitivity in which exposure to an allergen induces the body’s immune system to overreact. Gwendolen Lorch, DVM and assistant professor of dermatology at OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine, believes cases of pet allergies are trending upward, particularly in the Midwest. “Puppies that are bred and raised in Arizona may never present themselves with an allergy. But for areas like Ohio, an average vet practice may treat pet allergies and related ailments in 30-40 percent of all appointments booked,” Lorch says. Read more

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Firefighters test positive for toxic mold exposure

By John Dzenitis, http://www.wpbf.com/

firefightersmoldTwo firefighters have tested positive for toxic mold exposure, and the firefighters’ union believes old, run-down fire stations are to blame.

The two firefighters worked at Station No. 7 in Vero Beach and Station No. 10 in Fellsmere. In recent years, O’Connor said the firefighters have been complaining about leaky roofs at their stations, as well as mold and dead rats in the ceiling.

“We became very concerned when a lot of guys were complaining about watery eyes, upper respiratory infections, runny noses,” O’Connor said.

O’Connor claims the county has largely ignored firefighters’ complaints, and not enough money has been allocated to fixing up fire stations with serious health concerns. Read more

Peoria family building non-toxic, mold-free house

By Steve Tarter, http://www.pjstar.com/

MoldfreehomeThe Brooks family has been on a toxic adventure that few would want to endure after a prior home that had hidden mold affected all three of them. Wes, 18, has a hypersensitivity to mold that led to significant health problems. His mom, Donna, said, “It was very serious, he’s our miracle.” Together, they look forward to moving into their new northwest Peoria home that has been built to minimize exposure to harsh fumes and toxic elements given off by common construction materials. Dave Brooks, said they just hope their ordeal can help other families when they are faced with a similar situation.

Brooks, who serves as the general manager of the WCIC-FM radio station in Peoria, ticked off some of the special measures taken with the family’s new home.

“I personally inspected all the lumber used on the project to make sure it was free of mold. We kept all the stacked lumber on site covered while using low-moisture concrete with no fly ash,” he said. “We’re wrapping the whole house with a one-inch layer of foam to reduce condensation potential inside the wall assembly. The whole system is aggressively designed to keep water out of the basement,” said Brooks. Read more

Algae blooms create their own favorable conditions, new study finds

PUBLIC RELEASE: 8-JAN-2015 by DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

moldlake

Fertilizers are known to promote the growth of toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater and oceans worldwide, but a new multi-institution study shows the aquatic microbes themselves can drive nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in a combined one-two punch in lakes.

The findings suggest cyanobacteria — sometimes known as pond scum or blue-green algae — that get a toe-hold in low-to-moderate nutrient lakes can set up positive feedback loops that amplify the effects of pollutants and climate change and make conditions even more favorable for blooms, which threaten water resources and public health worldwide. The findings shed new light on what makes cyanobacteria so successful and may lead to new methods of prevention and control. Read more

More Mold In The Air Is Bad News For Allergy Sufferers

By Dr. Maria Simbra, http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com

It’s not spring pollen season. It’s not fall ragweed season. If you’re sneezing and stuffy right now, it could be mold allergies.

“I would say it’s one of the top. It’s up there,” says Dr. James Deangelo, of Allergy and Immunology Associates.

Outdoors, mold is in hay, straw, grass and leaves. But it’s indoors, too.

“You can see it growing, for example on a tree bark, or perhaps see it indoors growing on the walls. It will be black, green, different colors,” Dr. Deangelo points out.

The allergy is from what you can’t see – the mold spores. So small you can’t see them, but you inhale them.

“If you have a very hot rainy day, and right after the rain you feel that nasal congestion,” he describes. Read More

 

Excellent paper on mold allergy by the Mayo Clinic

by Shawn Garza

The well-respected Mayo Clinic has released a paper on mold allergies that contains a wealth of information on the subject.  Topics include:

  • Signs and Symptoms
  • Causes
  • Risk Factors
  • When to Seek Medical Advice
  • and more

At QuanTEM Laboratories, we believe that mold in the home or business can cause allergic reactions, but should not be a cause for fear.  It’s always best to call in a professional mold inspector and insure that any mold-like substance be tested by an accredited laboratory prior to any remediation activity.

This excellent paper by the Mayo Clinic can be viewed for free HERE