Blog Archives

War of words builds over possible regulation of lead bullets

By Julian Hattem, http://thehill.com

Wildlife conservationists are facing off against the gun lobby over hunters’ use of lead bullets.

This month, the National Rife Association (NRA) announced a new campaign to discourage regulators and lawmakers from limiting the use of lead bullets, which birds like eagles and vultures sometimes eat by accident and then contract lead poisoning.

The gun group calls the effort to regulate the bullets, as California is currently considering, an “assault on traditional lead ammunition” that is based in bad science.

Conservationists looking to protect the birds have fired back.

In the last five days, more than 50,000 people have signed a Sierra Club petition calling on the NRA to abandon its campaign.

“You’d think the NRA would want to protect the bald eagle – the very bird that is in their logo. But, it’s a mistake to expect logical thinking from an organization that constantly attacks policies even their own members support,” said Dan Chu, the organization’s senior director for its wildlands campaign, in a statement. “The truth is that non-toxic ammunition is accessible and effective for hunters and it helps preserve some of the most important parts of our nation’s unique wild heritage.”

Lawmakers have asked the federal government to get involved. Read more

 

Lead-Tainted Ginger Found In California Trader Joe’s And Whole Foods

By Chris Weller, http://www.medicaldaily.com

The state attorney general of California has accused Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, and ten other California grocery stores of selling ginger and plum candies with dangerously high levels of lead.

  • (Photo : michelle@TNS, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) Lead exposure from ginger products sold by California grocery stores could cause brain damage in customers.
(Photo : michelle@TNS, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) Lead exposure from ginger products sold by California grocery stores could cause brain damage in customers.

Amid the recent fervor regarding GMO-based foods, this case punctuates the growing importance of food labeling, especially as it pertains to children and pregnant women, who face a greater risk of lead poisoning.

While Lynda Gledhill, the attorney general’s press secretary, said the lead levels were sporadic — “meaning it wasn’t something that was naturally occurring” — the nature of this case poses the greatest threat, because pregnant women often enjoy ginger candy during their pregnancy and children are, no doubt, notorious candy eaters.

California’s Proposition 65 states businesses must disclose to consumers the harmful toxins found in food, toys, jewelry, and other products — a disclosure that the suit argues never happened. Read More